4 BIKE CAR CARRIER

4 bike car carrier. Bicycle hitch racks.

SPECIALIZED BIKE DEALER - BIKE DEALER


SPECIALIZED BIKE DEALER - MOUNTAIN BIKE FRONT RACK - BIKE PARTS USA INDEX.



Specialized Bike Dealer





specialized bike dealer















specialized bike dealer - Speed Dealer




Speed Dealer Moms


Speed Dealer Moms



Twelve inch vinyl pressing of this 2010 single. Speed Dealer Moms is John Frusciante, Aaron Funk and Chris McDonald. ''We each came in [to the project] with many drum machines, synths, modulars, effect, mixers, etc. Our process is based on listening to each other's programming as we go, and reacting to that as we program our own parts, playing off each other in every stage as we write. We recorded live to stereo, and as a rule, there were no overdubs and no edits. We didn't know who would drop which of our many parts over what other parts, which made it a really exciting way to jam out a piece of music.''










84% (13)





THE SUZUKI RE5. ROTARY ENGINE MOTORCYCLE.




THE SUZUKI RE5. ROTARY ENGINE MOTORCYCLE.





The Suzuki RE5 was a rotary-engine motorcycle manufactured by the Suzuki Motor Company from 1974 to 1976.


[edit] Notes
The Suzuki RE5 was a rotary-engine motorcycle manufactured by the Suzuki Motor Company from 1974 to 1976. There were only two production model years of the RE5, the 1975 M model available in "Firemist Orange" or "Firemist Blue" and the 1976 A model available only in black. Many "A" models were actually unsold M models which the local dealers themselves converted by using factory supplied kits. Main changes for 1976 included a black tank and sidecovers, GT750 style instruments, blinkers and tail lights. The "B" secondary points for overrun were disconnected on the A model as well.

The RE5 was touted as the future of motorcycling. The rotary engine, producing impressive power figures from a very small displacement, seemed destined for motorcycle applications. In reality, however, there was little demand for the technology and a major criticism of the RE5 was that it didn't do anything that you couldn't already buy in an existing motorcycle. The rotary engine produced a lot of heat, requiring a large and cumbersome radiator for liquid cooling as well as a separate underslung oil cooling radiator. The very high exhaust temperatures made the exhaust pipes heavy and complicated. They used an air cooling duct between inner and outer shells along with external heat guards. Suzuki responded to many other problems by adding complexity and weight. Ignition was CDI but used two sets of ignition points, one for normal acceleration and the other under deceleration. This also required additionals sensors and speed relays. There were three separate oil tanks (sump, gearbox and total loss tank)and two oil pumps (one for normal engine lubrication and one to supply oil for tip seal lubrication via the carby). The throttle controlled not only the primary carburettor butterfly but a second valve in the inlet manifold of the secondary throat (the "port" valve) as well as the oil pump which provided lubrication for the tip seals by mixing oil with fuel. The instruments encompassed the usual idiot lights but also a low fuel warning light, total loss oil tank light and digital gear indicator. The carburettor was adapted from a rotary power unit in a car and was exceedingly complicated by motorcycle standards (of the day) and only operated well when in a carefully tuned state, something often outside the abilities of the average owner.

One often overlooked aspect of the RE5 was that it was quite advanced in its steering and overall handling with several magazines around the world remarking on this. It also had exceptional ground clearance and you were a brave man indeed to ground the undersides of an RE5 on its original Japanese tyres. In a relatively short time Suzuki released its GS750 which was often touted as the best handling bike out of Japan and the first real Superbike which matched engine power with handling.

Motorcycle buyers in the mid-1970s did not take to the motorcycle with a rotary engine, and relatively few were sold with final numbers around 7,000 units worldwide with most going to the U.S.A.. The complex looks of the RE5 combined with some (easily rectified) teething problems turned many buyers away. The reality though was that the bike was much simpler than it looked and gave good service to the few who persisted. Many RE5 owners today have lovingly restored the bikes. Rotary Recycle USA dedicates a well stocked museum to rotary motorcycles generally and specialises in RE5 parts and service. On the road. the bike is slightly less powerful than the GT750 but produces substantially more real world torque than the M, A and B GT's. It also has better steering, front suspension and overall handling along with far superior ground clearance. Ridden sensibly the bike will return around 37 miles per imperial gallon but this can be highly variable, more so than its two or four stroke counterparts. Treated well, the RE5 is also a reliable bike provided you are mindful of its achilles heel, the single spark plug. Carry a spare and the bike is as good as any Japanese machine of the time and one of the most novel vintage machines on the road today.













Yellow Peril




Yellow Peril





Concluding the round-up of my garage full of mountain bikes, here's the Yellow Peril - the Specialized FSR Pro I bought in 2006.

The yellow paint job is a special one only released for the fleet of test bikes sent out to dealers.









specialized bike dealer







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